How to save wet electronics

how to save wet electronics

How to save electronics and hardware from water damage

Jul 25,  · How to Save Wet Electronics. Tech Talker: Quick & Dirty Tips to Navigate the Digital World Actually, it isn’t the water that breaks electronics; it’s the small particles that are dissolved. could save yourself a trip to the electronics store for a replacement. Here's how you can dry out wet smartphones, cameras and other electronic devices: Basic rescue steps Although drying procedures for smartphones, music players, cameras and tablets vary in certain ways, for the most part you would.

Does a spill spell the end of your smartphone? Tech Talker to the rescue with 4 easy ways to save your waterlogged device. But not many people know why, or what to do when this inevitably happens.

Are All Liquids Bad for Gadgets? Not all liquids are the same, ion-wise. Some have more ions than others. For instance, distilled water you buy from the store will have next to no ions, whereas sea water has a ton of them.

This difference will determine exactly how bad it is to drop your gadget into the liquid. Say you dropped your phone in perfectly distilled water. Take the Tech Talker Quiz to test your knowledge of all things tech-related. What if Your Gadget Gets Wet? In a perfect world, you would keep your electronics dry, away from any liquids that could damage them. But of course, things happen. So the damage is done, your phone or mp3 player has how to punish a 7 year old for lying how to save wet electronics a waterlogged pool toy.

What to do now? Here are 4 Quick and Dirty Tips to save your device from a watery death: Tip 1: Turn Off the Gadget The first and most important thing is to turn off your gadget and remove any batteries or power cords. If the power is off, there will be no electricity to short the circuit. This will improve the chances that your device can be recovered.

Tip 2: Remove All Water After the power is off, you should try to remove as much water as possible from the device, whether that means gently shaking it out, what is space and place maybe even taking off a few panels or pieces to get them really dry. Tip 3: Submerge in White Rice Next, get an airtight container and a lot of white rice.

Why white rice? Well for one, rice is great at soaking up water and it also happens to be a very common household item. The time you should keep your gadget in the container will vary depending on how severely it got drenched. If your phone decided to take a quick dip in the pool, a solid hour rice soak should do the trick. If it made its way slowly through a cycle in what is meant by sociology wash, you may want to keep it in there longer, up to a week.

For an extra added boost, after the rice does its job, let your device dry in front of a fan so any remaining water evaporates naturally. Keep in mind: The longer the rice has to do its job, the better the odds for your device. The earlier you take it out, the higher your risk of lingering water. Tip 4: Q-Tips and Alcohol Not Just for Parties Anymore If you know that water is stuck in certain small parts of your device, dab a Q-tip into some rubbing alcohol or vodka and then apply it to the specific parts of your device.

This will work well for the internal parts of many gadgets that have circuit boards. The alcohol will help to speed up the evaporation process that happens when your device sits out in the open air. Hopefully these tips will help you to salvage your soggy electronics, should the worst happen to them. If none of these help, find a good repair shop and read up to see if your warranty is still in effect.

Also, let me know if any of these tips have helped to recover your wet electronics. And if you have any tips of your own, post them what does compare mean in english in Comments or on my Facebook page. Phone in Water image courtesy of Shutterstock About the Author Eric Escobar Tech Talker demystifies technology and cutting edge devices so that even the most tech illiterate can understand what's going on with their computer or gadget — and what to do when something goes wrong.

Jump to Navigation. How to Save Your Wet Electronics. By Eric Escobar Tech Talker. October 21, We are currently experiencing playback issues on Safari. If you would like to listen to the audio, please use Google Chrome explain what cognitive development means Firefox. About the Author. Tech Talker demystifies technology and cutting edge devices so that even the most tech illiterate can understand what's going on with their computer or gadget — and what to do when something goes wrong.

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HowTo: Save Wet Electronics By Robin Mansur; 8/2/10 PM; Gadget Hacks. It's one of the most popular queries on the web, meaning the wet electronic disaster is likely a common mishap. There are many answers out there, but if you're lucky enough to have never googled it, pay attention now. You never know when you may drop your cell phone or Author: Robin Mansur.

One of the biggest enemies of electronic devices is moisture. Unfortunately, given the ever-increasing portability and popularity of smartphones, music players, cameras and tablet PCs, it seems all but certain that each of your vital tech tools will one day have a devastating encounter with H2O. But all may not be lost even after your cell phone takes that free-fall into the toilet, or your iPod goes through the washing machine in the back pocket of your favorite jeans.

But you could save yourself a trip to the electronics store for a replacement. Although drying procedures for smartphones, music players, cameras and tablet PCs vary in certain ways, for the most part you would follow the same process for any of them upon major contact with water or other liquid:. Again, the process varies slightly based on the type of device, but most actions are the same be it an MP3 player or tablet:. If after all this the device still does not work, take it to a professional repair person, or buy a new one.

It never hurts to prepare for the worst, especially when it comes to protecting your electronics against unexpected moisture. Intel Nasdaq: INTC is an industry leader, creating world-changing technology that enables global progress and enriches lives. By embedding intelligence in the cloud, network, edge and every kind of computing device, we unleash the potential of data to transform business and society for the better.

Intel, the Intel logo and other Intel marks are trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries. Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others. But they can be very hard to see. Although drying procedures for smartphones, music players, cameras and tablet PCs vary in certain ways, for the most part you would follow the same process for any of them upon major contact with water or other liquid: Get it out of the water as soon as possible.

An unprotected device has less than 30 seconds before water starts leaking into the hardware. Remove the battery. As the power source, this is more likely to be damaged by water than the actual device, especially if the item was on when contact was made with the water.

Remove the memory and SIM cards if possible. Remove any covers and external connectors. This will open up as many gaps, slots and crevices as possible for drying, and help ensure that no moisture is trapped inside the device. Remove any peripherals and set them aside to air-dry. Headphones, in particular, are tiny, but extremely water resistant, even capable of surviving multiple trips through a washing machine and dryer.

Look for signs of water damage. In the case of phones, manufacturers have placed a liquid damag e indicator on the inside near where the battery sits. Drying the Device Uncooked rice is a classic drying tool for wet electronics as it soaks up excess moisture in a few hours. Again, the process varies slightly based on the type of device, but most actions are the same be it an MP3 player or tablet: Get the water out.

Gently shake it out without dropping it, then use a cloth or paper towel to remove as much of the remaining water as possible. Rinse carefully with fresh water. This is especially important if your device has fallen into salt water or muddy water. Pat-dry the outside.

Use a soft cloth towel to dry off the exterior of the unit. Do not use the towel on any lenses or screens as this can scratch them if dirt or sand particles are in the towel fibers.

Instead, use a lens or microfiber cloth for these items. Use a vacuum cleaner or hand vac if possible. This will draw residual moisture away from the circuitry. Try a can of compressed air. Carefully spray with the can straight up to release only air, not the freezing liquid. Aim it at the keys, crevices, microphone, speaker and any other openings to force excess liquid out.

Cover the device with the product for at least 12 hours, turning the product over every 1 or 2 hours, or as often as possible. Note that larger items, such as cameras, could take up to a week to dry. Do not place the battery on a warm device. Do not use high or direct heat such as from a hair dryer or in the oven as this will damage the unit especially the LCD screen. Leave the item in a well-ventilated area to dry.

Speed up the process with use of a small fan if desired. Let the item air dry for at least a day or two. In 4 to 6 hours, check for signs of moisture seeping from the unit. If moisture is evident, repeat the vacuum and dry soak efforts. The Big Test To ensure that all parts are free of moisture, you may have to take your phone apart -- but only if you are sure of what you're doing.

Reinsert the battery and turn the unit on. If it does not work, take the battery out, plug in your charging cable and turn it on. If it now works, you may need a new battery. To check battery damage, try cleaning the battery connections with a cloth dampened with a light rubbing alcohol solution. Wait several hours for it to completely dry before reinserting the battery and trying again to turn the unit on.

Do not turn the unit on if you still smell rubbing alcohol. You may notice discolored areas on the LCD screen to your camera or smartphone. The device is safe to use at this point, however. If the screen does not return to normal within a couple days of use, you have permanent damage.

The device should not be used. Resume drying activities as noted earlier or perform the following:: A last-ditch effort is to take the unit apart. This is only recommended for basic cell phones, and only if you are percent comfortable with disassembling the device. Note that opening the unit up invalidates any warranty that may exist. Keep careful track of where all the pieces go as you disassemble.

Pat-dry each piece with a soft cloth, then reassemble and try again. How to Waterproof Your Technology Vacuum seal bags can protect devices from getting wet yet still leave accessory ports available for use. This sounds obvious, yet many people forget that the carrier their phone or laptop came in may not be designed for submersion.

Cases tend to come in three categories: standard, rugged and heavy-duty. Keep an eye on the submersion factor, a gauge of how many feet underwater the case will stay waterproof for at least 10 minutes.

Standard items tend to survive only a few feet; heavy duty can tolerate feet or more. Opt for a waterproof product. Cameras, in particular, offer a lot of choice in this department. Expect, however, to pay 10 percent to 20 percent more for the water-resistant of the device. Use zippered plastic storage bags.

This truly low-tech option keeps your device safe from water and other environmental hazards such as sand, dirt or dust while still giving you full use of the keys. The idea is to keep the phone or music player in the bag until you need it, but you can operate the device from within if need be. In this case, forget about using external mics or headphones and prepare for a lot of background noise as the bag shifts while you talk on the phone. Even without the background noise, sound quality through the bag will still be marginal.

Go for custom-fit bags. For a slightly improved experience, try a product that is designed to snugly fit your phone and allow you to keep it in the bag while talking. The same restriction applies to the use of headphones and other externals, but at least your audio will be more efficient. Vacuum seal your device. A step up from mere zippered bags are products that offer special-fit, airtight bags designed specifically for iPod, iPhone, iPad, Android, Kindle and similar products.

Designed primarily to resist scratching, it does offer some protection against moisture such as raindrops or sweat. Waterproof the device. If you decide after purchase that having a waterproof item is a good thing, you can manually safeguard against moisture with paint-on nano-coating products that claim to be undetectable once applied and offer protection for the life of the device. This content was originally published on the Intel Free Press website.

Tags: Free Press Archive. About Intel Intel Nasdaq: INTC is an industry leader, creating world-changing technology that enables global progress and enriches lives.





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5 thoughts on “How to save wet electronics”

  1. Hi Kevin, Great to see the routine tasks can be done automated simple. Can we apply the same rule when running pivot table also.

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